There are some questions that I really get a lot.  
So before contacting me, maybe you'll find your answers here!
 
cheers . andreas
  
How did you become an illustrator?
When I was little, I always told my parents, I wanted to be a »painter without a boss«, so that
somehow worked out I guess. I studied communications design because I only knew I wanted
to do something where I could be visually creative. After an internship and some working in a
big advertising agency, I started to really focus on illustration and I still believe it was a good idea.

How did you develop your style?
In short: It just happened. It wasn't until the end of my studies that I decided to concentrate on
illustration. Except for my thesis I hadn't done a lot of works in that direction and I needed to build
a portfolio. So I just started to make portraits of friends, drawings of animals, working with acrylics,
aerosols etc. I've always liked to use some crosshatching in my drawings, and after a while I started
to exaggerate it a bit. I've also analyzed the work of some other artists I liked and used some ideas
and techniques I found there to incorporate them into my own thing. It's all a neverending process
and there's never something like a »final« style. If you compare my recent pieces to the ones I did
straight out of university, you'll know what I mean.

How do you create your illustrations, do you use illustrator and patterns?
This question is mostly directed at the whole hatching thing. I do use Illustrator of course, since I'm
still a graphic designer, creating logos, writings etc. As far as my illustrations are concerned: Almost
everything you see is done by hand. The hatchings don't consist of patterns, they are real drawings
for every single artwork. I use fineliners, markers, acrylics, aerosols etc. All those single pieces get
scanned and put together in Photoshop. I sometimes use patterns or vectors, if it fits to a project or 
if it's needed (because of certain ways of printing for example), but it's not my typical working method.

Really?
Jep... Check it out here: »How to create ... « 

How do you get your drawings so symmetrical?
C'mon! There are different ways to do this and none of them is really difficult. I'm quite sure you can
figure that one out on your own...

What pens, colors, papers etc. do you use?
I don't use any specific brand or anything like that. Whatever I have that works at that moment, I'll use it.
Different materials need different pens. The same goes for different effects etc...  So you just have to try
it out on your own.

What is the name of your style?
I have no idea and I really don't care!

Do you work for free?
As long as we're not talking about a reliable charity project, no. On another note: Would you?

Where can I get prints/shirts?
Please check my stores at Society6 and Design by Humans.

Could you design a tattoo for me?
Sorry, but no. Tattoos are one of the most difficult things to do, because people are (understandably)
very nitpicking about the design and so those jobs mostly take a lot longer than one might think. On the
other hand I'd need to work together with your tattoo artist which would make it even more complicated
and time-consuming. I'd always advise people to go a tattooer, who does his or her own artworks.

Could I use one of your illustrations as tattoo for myself?
As long as it's only for your own private tattoo, you can use whatever want.
Would be great of course to send or post a photo of the result!

I want one of your pieces as a tattoo, could you send me some HighRes file?
Sorry, but no, I don't send out HighRes files for free.

What is your price range/daily rate/hourly rate?
Every job is a bit different, so I can't just give you such kind of definite numbers. If you'd like to work
with me and you need an estimate, shoot me an eMail explaining your idea: What exactly do you need,
where and when do you wanna use it, do you need it exclusively etc...

I'm a student looking for an intership, could I work for your company/office/studio?
Sorry, but no. At the moment there's neither the time nor the space for any interns.

I'm workin' on a report/project about you, could I send you some questions?
As much as I like to answer all the questions I get, I sometimes just don't have the time. So you can send
me everything, but please don't be mad if you don't hear back from me. In addition to these FAQs, I've
also done lots of interviews that are out there on Google.

Could you speak at our university/art school/company/trade show?
Maybe. I do some talks now and then, but it always depends on the conditions and especially my timetable.
So just shoot me a message explaining what exactly you'd need and I'll see what I can do!

Do you do live paintings? What would it cost?
Yes, I do live paintings, but as with everything else: To give you an estimate, please send me some details!

Who or what inspires you?
Actually, I get this a lot and it's really not that easy to answer. In the end, everything kind of inspires
you. Nature, the people surrounding you, music, the city, art... I guess I see myself and my work as kind 
of a product of all the impressions life has shown me so for.

What advice would you give to a young designer/illustrator?
Be productive and stay patient! There might be something like »talent«, but everybody I ever met, who 
excelled at anything, was working his ass off for it. So should you. If you don't have any clients yet, do 
personal work. Try different techniques, topics, materials, apps whatever... You never know, when you 
might need any of these things. It's way easier to learn new stuff as long as your schedule is not packed 
with commissions. Also: Do things you would also want to do for clients. People will hire you for the projects 
they see in your portfolio. Try to not let money influence your decisions too much. And most importantly: 
Be professional, be nice and don't behave like an arrogant »artist«. If you work hard enough, you might 
be able to make a living from your passion. How cool would that be?
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